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Jennie M. Thlunaut


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Author Topic: Jennie M. Thlunaut  (Read 166 times)
angela
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« on: April 02, 2011, 10:27:25 pm »

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angela
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« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2011, 03:04:27 pm »

 this morning i came acros an article that i clipped about a chilkat weaver... as i read it the name Jennie Thlunaut jumped out at me... to read all about this traditional artisan    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jennie_Thlunaut
http://search.juneauempire.com/fast-elements.php?type=standard&profile=juneau&querystring=%22JENNIE%20THLUNAUT%22
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Janie
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« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2014, 02:11:29 pm »

i located a picture Of Jennie Thlunaut at the: Alaska digital archives
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angela
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2018, 02:32:25 pm »

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National Indian Education AssociationLike Page
March 16, 2015 ·
NIEA continues to celebrate Women's History Month by honoring Alaskan Native Jenny Thlunaut.

#NativeWomenAreStrong

Jenny Thlunaut was born to Tlingit parents in Haines, Alaska. She is considered to be a master Chilkat weaver and was able to complete over 75 major pieces during her career, due to her skill and speed, over the course of seven decades. Chilkat blankets are considered to be mythical garments, worn by ceremonial dancers during rituals, they are edged in long fringes. The blankets are traditionally made from mountain goat wool and red cedar bark and are considered very difficult to master. In fact, the process of weaving one blanket will typically take a weaver working full-time over a year to complete, which makes Jenny’s accomplishments even more astounding. Thlunaut learned traditional weaving from her mother at a young age and is widely considered to be a major influence in the reemergence of traditional weaving in Alaska.

In 1984, she was chosen by the Smithsonian Institution to demonstrate her traditional weaving technique during their Festival of American Folklore. In 1986, she was awarded the National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship, a prestigious fellowship that “recognizes the recipients’ artistic excellence and supports their continuing contributions to our nation’s traditional arts heritage.” Her contributions to the reemergence of this form of traditional artwork and culture shows the importance of Native women like her.
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angela
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2018, 02:33:26 pm »

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